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FICTION: A small Southern town in the 1970s — and a couple — are torn by a mysterious triple murder. "Decent People" by De'Shawn Charles Winslow; Bloomsbury (272 pages, $28) ——— In "Decent People," his second novel, author De'Shawn Charles Winslow has a lot to say about a lot of things. In fewer than 300 pages, Winslow takes on love, racism, Black masculinity, morality, hypocrisy and justice ...

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Books in brief "Everyone in My Family Has Killed Someone" by Benjamin Stevenson; Mariner Books (384 pages, $28.99) ——— You know the kind of mystery where the explanation comes pouring out at the end in great detail and you, the reader, gnash your teeth because there was no way on Earth you could have solved it because you didn't have all of the facts? Well, Benjamin Stevenson's narrator, ...

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NONFICTION: Making a sweater from scratch — from shearing a sheep to dyeing the wool to knitting it up — is a project filled with lessons. "Unraveling" by Peggy Orenstein; Harper (224 pages, $27.99) ——— Do not be fooled by the adorable cover of "Unraveling," or by its flippant subtitle ("What I learned about life while shearing sheep, dyeing wool, and making the world's ugliest sweater"). This ...

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NONFICTION: An informative and compelling biography of the architect of the U.S. policy of "containing" the Soviet Union. "Kennan: A Life Between Worlds" by Frank Costigliola; Princeton University Press (648 pages, $39.95) ——— Architect of the U.S. policy of "containing" the Soviet Union during the Cold War, George F. Kennan was one of this country's preeminent diplomats, historians, and ...

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NONFICTION: Slim but incisive, this collection of graceful essays explores the struggle to be Black and female in a world of toxic patriarchy. "Black and Female" by Tsitsi Dangarembga; Graywolf Press (128 pages, $23) ——— "The first wound for all of us who are classified as 'black' is empire." So begins the first essay in Zimbabwean writer Tsitsi Dangarembga's trenchant new collection, "Black ...

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FICTION: A debut about books, friendship and parenthood set in New York City. "Vintage Contemporaries" by Dan Kois; Harper (336 pages, $27.99) ——— One night, Emily has an improbable yet memorable encounter in a New York City diner. She is eating alone when another young woman — a perfect stranger — slides into the booth opposite her and helps herself to her last dumpling. She turns out to be ...

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Progressive legislators are hoping the time is right to hike taxes on the rich, especially after three pandemic years. In a coordinated effort, lawmakers in eight states are proposing new taxes on their resident billionaires and ultra-millionaires.

Thursday’s British Academy Film Awards nominations brought plenty of drama. Steven Spielberg’s semi-autobiographical “The Fabelmans” and the Tom Cruise-led “Top Gun: Maverick” were largely snubbed by BAFTA voters after winning big at previous ceremonies. Neither is a finalist for film of the year, and Spielberg isn’t nominated for best director. The only nomination for “The Fabelmans” came for ...

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NONFICTION: In his third memoir, Henry Marsh moves from being a doctor to becoming a patient. It's a difficult transition. "And Finally" by Henry Marsh; St. Martin's Press (240 pages, $27.99) ——— When neurosurgeon Henry Marsh's third memoir opens, he has volunteered to take part in a study that requires a scan of his brain. "It seemed a bit of a joke at the time," he writes in "And Finally." ...

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NONFICTION: An inspiring doctor caters to, and befriends, the unhoused people of Boston. "Rough Sleepers" by Tracy Kidder; Random House (320 pages, $30) ——— The myth of Sisyphus pops up in Tracy Kidder's "Rough Sleepers," about a doctor who works with the unhoused population of Boston, and it's an apt one. The book's subject notes that Sisyphus, always striving toward a goal he'll never reach, ...

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NONFICTION: The fascinating story of Ana Belen Montes, an American bureaucrat — and spy for Cuba. "Code Name Blue Wren" by Jim Popkin; Hanover Square Press (351 pages, $27.99) ——— By the time you read this, Ana Belen Montes will have left the Admin Unit at Carswell Federal Medical Center in Fort Worth, Texas, her release scheduled for Jan. 8. The prison has been home to some of the nation's ...

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NONFICTION: A vibrant journalistic history assesses the critical value of foreign policy in an age of U.S. isolationism. "The Ghost at the Feast: America and the Collapse of World Order, 1900-1940" by Robert Kagan; Alfred A. Knopf (688 pages, $35) ——— From sea to shining sea. That phrase from "America the Beautiful" encapsulates the United States' two-oceans problem: its relative geographic ...

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FICTION: Five characters' lives intersect under a cloud of peril in a Sudanese border town "Ghost Season" by Fatin Abbas; Norton (304 pages, $28.95) ——— Google the word "Sudan" and the gamut of depressing news items will appear on your screen. Never shorn of tragedy, the narrative on Sudan and its neighbor, South Sudan, remains disheartening. Many might respond with a heavy dose of cynicism ...

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NONFICTION: Shannon Gibney combines speculative fiction with research to probe her adoptive life. "The Girl I Am, Was, and Never Will Be" by Shannon Gibney; Dutton (256 pages, $18.99) ——— "I must be adopted." "I hope I'm adopted." "Who are these strange people and how did I come to live among them?" Such thoughts cross many of our minds in childhood and adolescence, experiencing ourselves as ...

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Top history, memoir and other nonfiction for the first quarter of the year. Last week we gave you a list of fiction to watch for in 2023. Now here is some good-looking nonfiction. "Rough Sleepers," by Tracy Kidder. (Random House, Jan. 17) Kidder spent five years following a Boston doctor who brings health care to the unhoused. "Jellyfish Age Backwards," by Nicklas Brendborg. (Little, Brown, ...

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We’re looking at an eclectic mix of genres today, including two novels and two in crime/mystery. 'Summer of Rain, Summer of Fire' by Bill Meissner (Stephen F. Austin State University Press, $22) It’s the 1960s and the Keyhoe family, who live in a small Minnesota town, are being quietly torn apart by the war in Vietnam. Phil is spending the last summer before college goofing off with his best ...

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FICTION: In Jamila Minnicks' enlightening debut novel, a Black town in the 1950s sees the fight for integration as a misguided path forward. "Moonrise Over New Jessup" by Jamila Minnicks; Algonquin Books (336 pages, $28) ——— With her debut novel, "Moonrise Over New Jessup," Jamila Minnicks delves into the intricacies of the civil rights movement, offering an enlightening look at Black ...

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NONFICTION: A series of walks with urban historians yields surprising facts about New York City. "The Intimate City" by Michael Kimmelman; Penguin (272 pages, $30) ——— If you were in the next room while I was reading this book, you might have heard me emitting a series of exclamations: Wow! Huh? Hmm. Really? Michael Kimmelman's "Intimate City: Walking New York" — a collection of dialogues from ...

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