Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
The Ethical Life podcast: Should we cheer recent trips to space by billionaires?
spotlight

The Ethical Life podcast: Should we cheer recent trips to space by billionaires?

  • Updated
  • 0
{{featured_button_text}}

Episode 17: Richard Kyte and Scott Rada talk about the recent trips to space by Richard Branson and Jeff Bezos. Are those expensive excursions an exciting way to show the promise of space tourism or are they simply vanity projects that ignore the more pressing needs back on Earth?

The hosts also debate whether teens should be able to get vaccinated without their parents’ consent, and they discuss a recent study that shows how Americans have lost confidence in big institutions.

John Thoe: Climate crisis: Ethics of space tourism

Dr. Larissa Morgan: COVID-19 Vaccination of Minors Without Parental Consent

Axios: Massive trust gap splits America

Gallup: Americans' confidence in major U.S. institutions dips

About the hosts: Scott Rada is social media manager with Lee Enterprises, and Richard Kyte is the director of the D.B. Reinhart Institute for Ethics in Leadership at Viterbo University in La Crosse, Wis.

Locations

Catch the latest in Opinion

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

The music people adore when they’re young often crystallizes their identities and unlocks oceanic feelings. It’s easy to latch onto certain songs, become defensive about their brilliance and refuse to let go. For many rock fans — white men especially — a mighty object of youthful adoration is Eric Clapton, the heavily decorated rock musician. Clapton, who is 76, has been in the news this week ...

Consider this premise: For good or ill, the full legalization of marijuana in the United States for recreational purposes is inevitable. How did we reach the point of inevitability? Gradually then suddenly. Colorado was the first state to allow recreational marijuana sales, beginning on Jan. 1, 2014. Officials anticipated annual sales of $200 million and tax revenue of $70 million. By 2017, ...

One of the most anticipated cases of the U.S. Supreme Court term that ended this month was Fulton v. Philadelphia, which presented the conflict between the prohibition of discrimination against gay people and the religious liberty of the Roman Catholic Church. The court ruled unanimously that Philadelphia’s anti-discrimination laws as written could not require a Catholic social services agency ...

Individualism is good, collectivism is bad. That’s what I first concluded as a teenager after reading Friedrich Hayek’s seminal treatise, “The Road to Serfdom.” Every life experience since then has confirmed my hunch. That makes it all the more irritating when opponents of individualism, out of ignorance or bad faith, keep distorting what it is. A particularly misleading charge is that ...

Blockbusters are finally coming back to movie theaters. But the buzz is elsewhere in Hollywood. Streaming services are upending the film industry’s traditional model and consolidating power just as Hollywood’s major studios did during its Golden Age in the 1930s. AT&T is spinning off WarnerMedia to merge it with Discovery, forming a giant content conglomerate. Amazon is acquiring MGM and its ...

Several Republican states around the country are trying to tidy up their election laws after the 2020 pandemic mess. President Joe Biden called this a “21st century Jim Crow assault,” then said it was “the most significant test of our democracy since the Civil War.” But please don’t call him unfit for office, because the 25th Amendment might then be used to remove him with Vice President ...

Although the sentiment may seem paradoxical, libertarians should cheer this week’s decision by a federal judge upholding Indiana University’s vaccine mandate for students. The court reached the right result and the judge’s reasoning provides a forceful reminder that the government’s regulatory power, even in an emergency, is far from unlimited. Like other colleges and universities, Indiana ...

In Homer’s “Iliad,” the story of the war between the ancient Greeks and Trojans, the Greeks used a secret weapon, the Trojan horse, to vanquish their enemy at the close of a brutal 10-year conflict. In the battle against COVID-19, our own Trojan horse is vaccination. Cases and deaths have fallen dramatically since their peaks in the winter. But just as the Trojan horse did not end the threats ...

Throughout the country, schools (especially colleges and universities) are mandating that students receive COVID-19 vaccinations before they return for in-person learning. This is a terrible idea that will likely do more harm than good. For example, the University of Southern California “is requiring all students, faculty and staff to submit proof of vaccination for COVID-19 in order to access ...

Like never before in recent times, Cubans are protesting by the thousands. And they have good reason because their vicious, unendingly cruel, inept, corrupt communist bosses have mishandled the coronavirus, put the economy to sleep, wrecked the health system, kept food out and medicine out of the way, and converted liberty to just a word, nothing real. What should the United States do? Can we ...

The best local coverage, unlimited

Sign up for a digital subscription to The Press of Atlantic City now and take advantage of a great offer.

LEARN MORE

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News